Behavioral Health : Counselor: Overdose: Pain Pills, Heroin, Fentanyl and Beyond
4.50
Online
Elective
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About the Course:

In this course, the Healthcare professional will learn about the pharmacology of opioids, risk factors for opioid addiction, and individual and community consequences of addiction. Additionally, the provider will become familiar with the levels of prevention theory and how to effectively prevent, screen, treat, and reduce harm from opioid addiction.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the basic pharmacological process of opioids and understand the difference between opioid agonists, partial-agonists, and antagonists.
  • Explain the difference between opioid tolerance, dependence, and addiction.
  • Describe the symptoms of opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Identify early childhood experiences that are risk factors for development of chronic diseases.
  • Define neuroadaptation and explain long-term effects of opioids on the brain.
  • Recognize the role of the Healthcare professional in promoting the theory of prevention as it applies to opioid addiction.
  • Define two risk factors and two protective factors for substance abuse.
  • Learn to advocate for the patient population at-risk for opioid abuse and overdose by having a clear understanding of the neurobiology of addiction.


About the author:
Amanda LaManna, MSN, NP-C, WHNP-BC is a nurse practitioner living and practicing in Rochester, New York. Amanda has worked in emergency medicine for the past 4 years and currently works at the region’s Level I trauma and tertiary care center. Amanda also works as a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE). Amanda graduated in 2011 from Yale School of Nursing, where she completed a master’s degree specializing in both adult and women’s health. Prior to working in emergency medicine, Amanda worked in the pain management specialty with a physician committed to reducing the excessive use of opioids for chronic pain. Amanda came to the medical field from a background in the arts, obtaining a dual degree in violin performance and Italian literary studies from the University of Connecticut in 2008. She is a proud mother to one-year-old twin girls.

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Overdose: Pain Pills, Heroin, Fentanyl and Beyond

4.50

About the Course:

In this course, the Healthcare professional will learn about the pharmacology of opioids, risk factors for opioid addiction, and individual and community consequences of addiction. Additionally, the provider will become familiar with the levels of prevention theory and how to effectively prevent, screen, treat, and reduce harm from opioid addiction.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Describe the basic pharmacological process of opioids and understand the difference between opioid agonists, partial-agonists, and antagonists.
  • Explain the difference between opioid tolerance, dependence, and addiction.
  • Describe the symptoms of opioid withdrawal syndrome.
  • Identify early childhood experiences that are risk factors for development of chronic diseases.
  • Define neuroadaptation and explain long-term effects of opioids on the brain.
  • Recognize the role of the Healthcare professional in promoting the theory of prevention as it applies to opioid addiction.
  • Define two risk factors and two protective factors for substance abuse.
  • Learn to advocate for the patient population at-risk for opioid abuse and overdose by having a clear understanding of the neurobiology of addiction.


About the author:
Amanda LaManna, MSN, NP-C, WHNP-BC is a nurse practitioner living and practicing in Rochester, New York. Amanda has worked in emergency medicine for the past 4 years and currently works at the region’s Level I trauma and tertiary care center. Amanda also works as a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE). Amanda graduated in 2011 from Yale School of Nursing, where she completed a master’s degree specializing in both adult and women’s health. Prior to working in emergency medicine, Amanda worked in the pain management specialty with a physician committed to reducing the excessive use of opioids for chronic pain. Amanda came to the medical field from a background in the arts, obtaining a dual degree in violin performance and Italian literary studies from the University of Connecticut in 2008. She is a proud mother to one-year-old twin girls.