Occupational Therapy: Suicide Awareness and Prevention
39.95
Online
Elective
Please select your state to enroll in this course
Course release date: 4/30/2020

About the Course:

This intermediate-level course will provide occupational therapy practitioners with the information necessary to identify those at risk and those demonstrating symptoms associated with suicidal precursors and will help to describe the role of occupational therapy practitioners working across practice settings including approaches to assessment, intervention, and referral.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the risk factors that are associated with suicide.
  • Summarize the symptoms/warning signs associated with suicide.
  • Compare and contrast appropriate evaluation and intervention approaches in addressing suicidality.
  • Relate concepts of holistic approaches in occupational therapy in addressing suicide risk.
  • Differentiate the role of occupational therapy from other disciplines.
  • Recommend various ‘avenues’ of occupational therapy in suicide awareness/prevention.

About the Authors:
Sharon D. Novalis, PhD, OTR/L
is an assistant professor in the Occupational Therapy Program at Chatham University. Dr. Novalis has over 27 years of experience in the field of occupational therapy. She has worked in practice and leadership capacities, both as an occupational therapy assistant and as an occupational therapist. Dr. Novalis has presented at state conferences and local professional association meetings on the topics of suicide awareness, suicide prevention, and the role of occupational therapy. She has several scholarly works, including a continuing education article, on the topic of the role of occupational therapy in suicide awareness and working with survivors, which was published by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Dr. Novalis is a member of the Chatham University Mental Health Task Force, which, in part, has been responsible for the provision of educational materials to faculty on the topic of suicide awareness and prevention. Dr. Novalis has been invited to present the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention material to several university psychology classes and has also co-presented on this topic to a university-wide audience. Dr. Novalis is an active volunteer member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She has been the co-chair for the Out of the Darkness Campus at Chatham University, establishing the first walk in 2017. She has served as facilitator of a process group at the International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day in Pittsburgh, 2017 and as a guest presenter in 2018. She continues her participation as a volunteer with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in support of community awareness events and educational endeavors. 

Deanna Hamilton, PhD is an associate professor of graduate psychology at Chatham University where she has been a faculty member since 2006. Dr. Hamilton has taught a variety of courses at Chatham including developmental psychology, psychopathology, positive psychology, ethics and professional development, and supervision. Dr. Hamilton earned her doctoral degree in clinical/developmental psychology from Bryn Mawr College in 2005. She completed her doctoral internship at the University of Pittsburgh Counseling Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Duquesne University Counseling Center. Dr. Hamilton has published research in the areas of positive psychology and well-being, and self-efficacy among graduate student trainees. Her doctoral advisees have researched and successfully defended dissertations on such topics as the relationship between athletic identity and well-being, mindful living and its effect on stress and well-being, and attributional insight in depression. Dr. Hamilton has collaborated with colleagues at Chatham University and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention on suicide awareness and prevention initiatives across the university. 
 
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Suicide Awareness and Prevention

39.95
Course release date: 4/30/2020

About the Course:

This intermediate-level course will provide occupational therapy practitioners with the information necessary to identify those at risk and those demonstrating symptoms associated with suicidal precursors and will help to describe the role of occupational therapy practitioners working across practice settings including approaches to assessment, intervention, and referral.

Learning Objectives:
  • Identify the risk factors that are associated with suicide.
  • Summarize the symptoms/warning signs associated with suicide.
  • Compare and contrast appropriate evaluation and intervention approaches in addressing suicidality.
  • Relate concepts of holistic approaches in occupational therapy in addressing suicide risk.
  • Differentiate the role of occupational therapy from other disciplines.
  • Recommend various ‘avenues’ of occupational therapy in suicide awareness/prevention.

About the Authors:
Sharon D. Novalis, PhD, OTR/L
is an assistant professor in the Occupational Therapy Program at Chatham University. Dr. Novalis has over 27 years of experience in the field of occupational therapy. She has worked in practice and leadership capacities, both as an occupational therapy assistant and as an occupational therapist. Dr. Novalis has presented at state conferences and local professional association meetings on the topics of suicide awareness, suicide prevention, and the role of occupational therapy. She has several scholarly works, including a continuing education article, on the topic of the role of occupational therapy in suicide awareness and working with survivors, which was published by the American Occupational Therapy Association. Dr. Novalis is a member of the Chatham University Mental Health Task Force, which, in part, has been responsible for the provision of educational materials to faculty on the topic of suicide awareness and prevention. Dr. Novalis has been invited to present the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention material to several university psychology classes and has also co-presented on this topic to a university-wide audience. Dr. Novalis is an active volunteer member of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She has been the co-chair for the Out of the Darkness Campus at Chatham University, establishing the first walk in 2017. She has served as facilitator of a process group at the International Survivors of Suicide Loss Day in Pittsburgh, 2017 and as a guest presenter in 2018. She continues her participation as a volunteer with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention in support of community awareness events and educational endeavors. 

Deanna Hamilton, PhD is an associate professor of graduate psychology at Chatham University where she has been a faculty member since 2006. Dr. Hamilton has taught a variety of courses at Chatham including developmental psychology, psychopathology, positive psychology, ethics and professional development, and supervision. Dr. Hamilton earned her doctoral degree in clinical/developmental psychology from Bryn Mawr College in 2005. She completed her doctoral internship at the University of Pittsburgh Counseling Center and a postdoctoral fellowship at the Duquesne University Counseling Center. Dr. Hamilton has published research in the areas of positive psychology and well-being, and self-efficacy among graduate student trainees. Her doctoral advisees have researched and successfully defended dissertations on such topics as the relationship between athletic identity and well-being, mindful living and its effect on stress and well-being, and attributional insight in depression. Dr. Hamilton has collaborated with colleagues at Chatham University and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention on suicide awareness and prevention initiatives across the university.